Student Columns

A New Organ?

A New Organ?

Kelly Shen is back again with another fascinating topic in science - made short and sweet just for you! Let's read about a potential new discovery in the human body... (Photo from Wikimedia Commons) It’s not every day that we discover a new organ, but scientists did just that. Though it isn’t an organ yet, the discovery of the interstitium has sparked debates - and could potentially be the newest organ in the human body. What is the Interstitium?  The interstitium is a fluid-filled space existing between a structural barrier, such as a cell wall or the skin, and internal…
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Let’s Talk Books: A Farewell to Arms with Dr. Harper

Let’s Talk Books: A Farewell to Arms with Dr. Harper

In this episode of Adrian's Let's Talk Books series, he chats with English teacher Dr. Harper about one of Ernest Hemingway's most famous works, A Farewell to Arms. They will be discussing relationships during times of war and why it's worth revisiting the novel in 2020. Photo from Unsplash https://youtu.be/mpVIGZQMtTM https://youtu.be/aT9zJQOOn2A
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Let’s Talk Books: The Tenth of December

Let’s Talk Books: The Tenth of December

Adrian and Mr. Moffat talk about a short story collection that all of you should definitely check out! This is some amazing insight from a teacher who is very experienced with the world of short stories! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XY_vpkI_B7g&feature=youtu.be https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JldX1xBKoR4
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How Americans Are Helping Scientists During The Pandemic

How Americans Are Helping Scientists During The Pandemic

Episode 3 of Kelly Shen's science series! Enjoy an informative article that lets you know how you can help. All images are taken from Wikimedia Commons. In March, everything came to a standstill when the coronavirus swept through the country. However, there has been an uptick in “citizen scientists”. These people took the opportunity to go outdoors and start documenting the nature around them. When field work stops, the population steps up The contributions of volunteers are crucial at a time like this, when research facilities are shut down. Many citizen science websites, like eBird, founded by Cornell Lab of…
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Japan’s First Public Manned Flying Car

Japan’s First Public Manned Flying Car

Kelly Shen '23 Photo provided by Unsplash https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Gx5ijVqxNM Are flying cars still a thing of the future? Not anymore. Japan based-company Skydrive had their first public manned flying car test on Aug. 25, as a pilot flew the SD-03 around a test field for four minutes. The aircraft has one seat and operates with eight motors and two propellers on each corner, and lifted about 3 meters (or about 10 feet) into the air.  Facts about the SD-03 (according to Business Insider):  The SD-03 is the world's smallest electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) vehicle at 6.56 feet tall, and…
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What Made Einstein So Smart?

What Made Einstein So Smart?

Welcome to Kelly's first article of her science series, where she'll be covering everything relating to science and the recent breakthroughs happening in the field! (Images are cited or found using Creative Commons) Einstein’s brain has always been a source of mystery, even 65 years after his death. Some speculated that his genius may have been the result of having a bigger brain, or perhaps it was a combination of his upbringing and environment, but there is one often overlooked aspect that contributed to his intelligence: glial cells.  The backstory When Einstein passed away in 1955, at Princeton Hospital in…
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