Student Columns

Acting Against AAPI Hate Crimes

Acting Against AAPI Hate Crimes

Anisha Menath '21, image from stopaapihate.org COVID-19 has revealed some of the largest inequities and injustices that have always existed within our country. Most recently, on March 16th, a man entered a small business and killed 8 people. 6 of the people who were murdered identified as Asian women. This hate crime, although an individual situation in Atlanta, Georgia, is not an isolated situation and shows the rise in anti-Asian violence due to COVID-19. According to the STOP AAPI (Asian American and Pacific Islander) National Report there have been 3,795 reports of anti-Asian hate crimes in the past year. This…
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Mercator Maps!

Mercator Maps!

William Yen ‘23 Social Science - Geography When projecting our three-dimensional earth onto a two-dimensional map, cartographic flaws are inevitable. The Mercator Projection, a common map used on navigation platforms like Google Maps, is rendered through a series of linear projections from a globe to a cylinder surrounding it. When the cylinder is unraveled, it reveals a 2D map. [This is a good visualization of the process] This method of map-making allows for angular precision, which is why navigation services prefer this map. However, it sacrifices the accuracy of the sizes of land masses, creating distortions across various latitudes. Most…
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A Light Free Zone for Birds

A Light Free Zone for Birds

Kelly Shen '23, image from Unsplash.com One of the many consequences of light pollution is an increase in bird deaths. Artificial light emitted from homes or skyscrapers during the night time can confuse migratory birds, who use the stars and night sky to navigate. When it is cloudy and the stars are hidden, the birds will become disoriented, which leads them to crash into buildings or go off course. Windows also play a role, reflecting light and images of their surroundings. In the morning, hundreds of dead birds line the street, a grim reminder of the effects of light pollution. …
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The Andromeda Galaxy

The Andromeda Galaxy

Carl Crum '24 Although situated 2 million light years away, the Andromeda Galaxy is nonetheless visible to the unaided eye when seen from a dark sky site, which makes it the farthest space object observable without a telescope. According to Greek mythology, Andromeda was the daughter of King Cephus and Queen Cassiopeia of Ethiopia. When Queen Cassiopeia offended the Nereids (sea nymphs) by claiming she was more beautiful than them, the nymphs complained to Poseiden, who sent the sea monster Cetus to decimate her lands as punishment. To end the conflict, King Cephus offered princess Andromeda as a sacrifice to…
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Quad Queries Episode #2: Connor Fitzpatrick

Quad Queries Episode #2: Connor Fitzpatrick

The day has finally come! Quad Queries has been relaunched and its second episode is out now. Manuel Fuentes and Alexander Lourdes Medel interview Connor Fitzpatrick to get some advice on colleges, studying, and navigating SHP as an underclassman. https://vimeo.com/522176264 Music: Eric Godlow Beats (free for non-profit use)
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The Jellyfish Nebula

The Jellyfish Nebula

Carl Crum '24 It’s often said that we know less about the bottom of the ocean than outer space, but who knew that aquatic creatures roamed the stars? IC 443, or the Jellyfish Nebula, is the wispy remains of a red supergiant star which went supernova thousands of years ago. When a star is larger than 10-15 solar masses, it only burns for several million years. During that time, it progressively expands and cools, and once it exhausts its nuclear fuel, the entire star will collapse under its immense gravity in a matter of seconds. However, instead of dissipating into…
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Long Lost Bird Found After 170 Years

Long Lost Bird Found After 170 Years

Kelly Shen '23, photo from the New York Times Muhammad Suranto and Muhammad Rizky Fauzan trekked into the South Kalimantan rainforest in Borneo, and spotted a black and brown bird darting between the trees. They couldn’t identify it, so they captured one and sent photos of it to a birdwatching group, BW Galeatus. One member, Joko Said Trisiyanto, matched the bird to the black-browed babbler, which was listed in his guidebook as extinct. He sent the photos to ornithologist Panji Gusti Akbar, who passed the photos along to many other experts. After the initial shock faded, experts agreed: it had…
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The Needle Galaxy

The Needle Galaxy

Carl Crum '24 3/4/2021 - Needle Galaxy It’s that time of year again: Galaxy Season! From March to May, astrophotographers in northern latitudes set up their largest telescopes each night in search of the furthest and faintest deep-space wonders known to man. Captured last season, this photo is of the Needle Galaxy (NGC 4565), an edge-on galaxy located approximately 40 million light years away in the constellation of Coma Berenices. The central nucleus is somewhat bloated as a result of gravitational interactions with another galaxy. Although the Needle appears skinny and small, don’t let that deceive you: in reality, it…
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Let’s Talk Books: Don Quixote, Sula, and The Great Gatsby with Mr. Ramos

Let’s Talk Books: Don Quixote, Sula, and The Great Gatsby with Mr. Ramos

The wait was worth it! Adrian de Vernou's Let's Talk Books series is back but with 3 books this time. Mr. Ramos and Adrian will be exploring them individually and in dialogue with another in this special episode. Enjoy! Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, Sula by Toni Morrison, and The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald— beware: spoilers included. https://youtu.be/fQW4csN1bVk https://youtu.be/EOcUrhXk17g Photo from Unsplash.com
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